Posts tagged ‘videos’

August 13, 2011

Josh Lucas Joins Oceana

You may remember Josh Lucas as the adorable down-home old flame to Reese Witherspoon’s city-fied character in Sweet Home Alabama, or perhaps from his appearance in A Beautiful Mind.  From now on, I’ll remember him, and score his reputation right up there, with the likes of other actors that have joined forces with wildlife nonprofit groups to further the cause and campaigns on behalf of ocean conservation.  And yes, for the record, that puts him up there with Leonardo DiCaprio, January Jones, Adrian Grenier, Ted Danson, Kate Walsh and plenty of other recent spokespeople to stand by Oceana‘s side.

What about you?  Want to be a Wavemaker?  Oceana makes it incredibly easy, and they won’t overwhelm you with emails either!  Join up.

June 15, 2011

Perspectives on Ocean Science

http://www.uctv.tv/player/player_uctv_bug.swf

Do you share my love of ocean documentaries and online videos? (Seriously, you should see my Netflix cue, it’s almost nothing but docs!) Well do I have the motherload for you: UCTV’s Perspectives on Ocean Science!

There is so much here including talks on climate change, magnetic fields, ocean circulation patterns, volcanoes, deep sea animal diversity, marine debris, ocean acidification, and on and on. There are so many videos that I havent had time to view more than a handful myself but I feel that they’re all worthwhile in their own way. If you love TED, you’ll like this!

June 13, 2011

Techno Flying Manatee Attack!

I spent the morning reading Jon Lithgow’s very lovely I’m a Manatee children’s book to a squad of camp children at the local library.  One of the kids had a great question: “What do manatees sound like?”  Well, squeaky.  That’s the real answer.

It made me think of my favorite line in the book though: “I’m a manatee!  I’m a manatee!  … No one will ever hear me use profanity!”

Naturally I believed Lithgow on this, until I found the above video while googling “manatee sounds”.  This is decidedly NSFW if you turn your speakers up loud.. but I’m pretty sure the title tipped you off to that!  You can file this under dumb but in my sleep-deprived state it’s solidly hilarious.

Tags: , ,
June 6, 2011

Video Break: Natural Capital Project

The Natural Capital Project is a partnership between The Nature Conservancy, the World Wildlife Fund, University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment, and Stanford University’s Woods Institute on the Environment that seeks to understand and value environmental services in a way that is tangible and immediate: through money.

It’s great that we can appeal to people’s intrinsic sense of environmental worth in outreach and often get them to express it. (That sunset is beautiful!  I like clean beaches to play on.  I enjoy fishing for mahi mahi.  I like breathing oxygen!)  But these rather subjective sentiments don’t always hold up in political circles.  If we can attach monetary amounts to ecosystem services, and not simply ecosystem products, we might make more headway in stressing their importance to human health and economies.  Check out NCP’s website to learn more!

June 4, 2011

Shedd's Newest Little Bundle

Shedd Aquarium in Chicago welcomed a tiny Pacific white-sided dolphin calf to its pools just in time for World Ocean’s Day next week! (Aquarium and zoo types call this species “Lags” as a short form of their genus name.)  The little tyke is actually quite large – about thirty pounds and three feet in length – compared to his mother.  I worked around marine mammals and cetaceans for several years in a spot that routinely had pregnant and laboring females and always missed the births.  They go pretty quick once you see those little tail flukes present themselves!  Shedd did a lovely job capturing the event on film for everyone to see.

Speaking of World Ocean’s Day, will you be anywhere near Washington, DC on June 7th?  The Smithsonian will be hosting a splash event at high noon exactly so hightail it there if you’re curious to learn more!

May 31, 2011

No Rear Flippers, No Problem!

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=24350964&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=00adef&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

The wonderful people at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center posted this video over the weekend of a female leatherback sea turtle, nicknamed “Clover”, nesting near Juno Beach. Clover is a known turtle – and easily sighted – because she’s missing both of her rear flippers!

You’ll see little stumps in the video but trust me, her actual flippers would be much larger.  Clover was first sighted by LMC in 2003 with only a portion of a flipper missing.  By 2005 both rear flippers were effected and in 2007 she showed up with no rear flippers!  Judging by the marks and scars across the stumps, and even her front flippers, the LMC crew thinks she’s been tangling with sharks and so far living to tell the tale.

The fact that this female has been able to survive such injuries on her own in the open ocean is really quite the testament to the strength of leatherback immune systems.  I mean.. do  you know how many bacteria and viruses swarm in the average drop of salt water?   It’s not like these guys can swim off to the nearest pharmacy for some Betadine and Neosporin!

If you know much about sea turtles, you know that they make use of those enormous paddle-like flippers to dig out their nest sites in the sand.   It’s crucial that the nests are deep enough to protect the eggs and also generate proper incubation temperatures.

So how do you dig out all that sand if you don’t have rear flippers?! Easy, you get the LMC’s biologist crew to help you. Each time they spot Clover they creep up behind her and help her dig out the nest so that she doesnt crush her eggs. So far this season, Clover has nested SIX times! That’s a lot of ninja-like biologist skills needed to help her little ones have a chance at life.

All of this help for Clover is in addition to monitoring nearly ten miles of beach on the Atlantic.  The season runs roughly May 1st to October 31st, depending a bit on lunar cycles.  At a month in, here’s the LMC’s current nesting totals for the year:

Greens: 9

Leatherbacks: 189

Loggerheads: 1,156

Thank you to the LMC staff for your hard work! You can check them out on their website, and keep in mind they run tours and camps throughout the summer that are not only fascinating and fun, but also help support this nonprofits’ efforts on behalf of wildlife.

May 28, 2011

Okinawa: Pure Perfection

Shh.. I’m spellbound by the combined forces of one of my favorite bands, whale sharks, manta rays, and other beauties in this jewel of a display. If the writers of What Dreams May Come were right and we all get our own personal heavens, this is what mine looks like.